BAL@WSH: Davis drills a solo homer to right field

BALTIMORE -- Chris Davis received his April American League Player of the Month award on the field before Wednesday's game against the Nationals.

Orioles executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette was on hand to help present the award and a check during the on-field ceremony.

Davis hit .348 with eight doubles, nine home runs and 28 RBIs in 27 games in April.

"For a power hitter, he's been pretty consistent so far," manager Buck Showalter said. "Defense and how he's handled the success that's come his way is the thing I'm most proud of. I think we all know, Chris, his contact-to-damage ratio is pretty good."

Davis received a specially engraved crystal trophy and an engraved watch from MLB.

In recognition of Davis' performance, the Orioles will donate $2,500 to Luke's Wings, a non-profit military organization dedicated to the support of current and former service members who have been wounded in battle. Luke's Wings provides families with the means to visit injured service members during their hospitalization and rehabilitation.

Davis also has pledged to donate $100 for every home run he hits this season to Luke's Wings.

The first baseman hasn't slowed down his offensive pace in May. In 88 at-bats entering Wednesday's game, the lefty was hitting .341 with eight home runs, 10 doubles and 19 RBIs.

Flaherty recalled by Orioles, put right to test

SD@BAL: Flaherty's solo shot ties the game

BALTIMORE -- When the Orioles optioned Ryan Flaherty 10 days ago, they did so with the hope that he would prove himself enough offensively to make his stay in Triple-A a short one.

Mission accomplished.

The challenge now is for Flaherty, who was recalled prior to Wednesday's game in place of infielder Yamaico Navarro, to translate that success to the Major Leagues.

"There was some stuff physically, but a lot of mental stuff," Flaherty said of the adjustments he made in Norfolk. "I feel like I'm in a position where I can help this team."

At the time of his demotion, Flaherty was hitting .133/.228/.233 through 30 games, and manager Buck Showalter wanted to let the 26-year-old get his feet back under him in a less pressurized environment. Flaherty played eight games for Norfolk, batting .265 with two homers and five RBIs, delivering four multihit efforts with the Tides.

"Ryan hit a home run yesterday to left-center field," said Showalter, who went off the recommendation of Triple-A manager Ron Johnson in evaluating whether Flaherty was ready. "We know the stuff's a little better here [in the Majors], obviously. He's handled the breaking ball a little better, we'll see how it plays.

"The good thing about him, you know, he's defending, and that's something that's big for us like it is everybody."

The organization favors Flaherty's glove over Navarro's, which was another factor in the decision. Navarro hit .286/.333/.357 in eight games for the Orioles, but he struggled to make some plays in the field. Showalter has placed a premium on defense.

Still, Flaherty will have to produce with the bat to stay with the big league club, with Showalter reminding reporters Wednesday that "Ryan knows it's not an open-ended ticket."

Strop pain free after latest 'pen session, drills

PUR@DOM: Strop ends rally in seventh, strikes out two

BALTIMORE -- Orioles reliever Pedro Strop (lower back strain) threw a bullpen session Wednesday with pitching coach Rick Adair. Strop threw 20-25 pitches and said he was pain free.

"First couple of the throws on the mound in the [bullpen], I was kind of afraid a little bit, just thinking about it. But then after a couple of throws, I didn't feel anything, I just let it go and there was no pain at all," Strop said.

"Just getting the normal delivery and everything, and it feels good," he said.

Strop said he hasn't been told if he'll do a Minor League rehab assignment before he returns from the 15-day disabled list. He's eligible to return June 8.

The converted shortstop also took ground balls in the infield with Adair before Wednesday's game.

"That was like a drill, because I used to be a natural shortstop, so they wanted it to be like natural, arm-wise, and stuff like that," Strop said.

"You get used to your normal delivery, because it's something you don't have to think to do it, because it's natural from [when you were a] little kid, so that way you get to clear your mind instead of thinking about all those mechanics and stuff -- just bring your natural arm motion."

Strop joked with reporters that he doesn't think a move back to shortstop is in his future, because he doesn't know who would hit for him.

Reimold's rehab focused on building strength

BAL@LAA: Reimold sends one over the left-field wall

BALTIMORE -- Orioles outfielder Nolan Reimold (strained right hamstring) stayed in Baltimore during the team's recent road trip to continue his rehab.

Manager Buck Showalter said it made the most sense for Reimold to see a local physical therapist.

"When they were on the road, I went up to Johns Hopkins and was rehabbing up there," Reimold said. "And then I came in here [Oriole Park at Camden Yards] and did my workout."

Reimold said Wednesday that he's continued to rehab, work out and get "active rest."

"Strengthening and getting the flexibility back in my hammy -- that's the program for now," Reimold said.

Reimold is unsure of the timetable for his return, but he said that Showalter asked him not to return until he's 100 percent. In Reimold's estimation, that shouldn't be too much longer. At this point, he's running but hasn't let loose in a full pain-free sprint.

"It's calmed down a lot. I've been running up to that certain point. And I've been doing all the exercises I'm supposed to do," Reimold said. "The threshold went up to where I can run without feeling it, so just keep working toward and moving in that direction."

Worth noting

• Top position player prospect Jonathan Schoop was re-evaluated Wednesday by a doctor in California, who confirmed the original diagnosis of a stress fracture in his lower back. He will rest for four weeks, and manager Buck Showalter said he could be playing in five to six weeks.

• Dylan Bundy (tightness in flexor tendon) is pain free and has been for about a week with full range of motion, Showalter said. Bundy will see Dr. James Andrews on June 3, just before the six-week mark from when he got a platelet-rich plasma injection.

• Wilson Betemit (right knee sprain) and Brian Roberts (strained right hamstring) each played catch and did hitting drills off a tee as they progress toward possible returns from the disabled list.

• Backup catcher Taylor Teagarden (dislocated left thumb) caught seven innings in a extended spring game Wednesday and will DH on Thursday, although he could go to one of the team's affiliates and start a rehab assignment instead, Showalter said.